A.N.P DZ Défense

A.N.P DZ Défense

Forum Militaire
 
AccueilFAQS'enregistrerConnexion
Bienvenu sur le forum anpdz

Partagez | 
 

 Comprendre l'action de l'armée russe en Crimée

Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
helios
Colonel
Colonel
avatar

Messages : 235
Date d'inscription : 17/03/2014
Médaille sans Chevron

MessageSujet: Comprendre l'action de l'armée russe en Crimée   Dim 25 Mai - 15:52

Voici un article intéressant de comment a agi l'armée russe.
Il ne faut pas perdre de vue que ce qu'y c'est passé est avant tout politique et non militaire (on peut estimer que l'annexion de la Crimée fut une action 90% politique et 10% militaire.

Un mot -un avis personnel- sur l'auteur :
Dmitry Gorenburg est un éminent spécialiste de l'armée russe. Que ce soit sur l'armement, le commandement, l'organisation, la recherche et -moins glamour- la corruption. Cependant, j'estime qu'il est médiocre prévisionniste des événements géopolitiques. Il a rarement réussi à bien prévoir une évolution de situation telle qu'elle s'est avérée plus tard.
Ce qui n'empêche pas ses interventions d'être extrêmement pertinentes.

Bonne lecture

Citation :

With the rapid operation that resulted in the annexation of Crimea earlier this year, the Russian military returned to the collective consciousness of the American public. Many commentators were impressed with the “little green men’s” professional demeanor and shiny new equipment. In some cases, this impression was undeservedly expanded to apply to the rest of the Russian military. In this context, it is important to discuss what the Crimean operation does and does not tell us about the capabilities of the Russian military.

The first clear lesson from the Crimean operation is that the Russian military understands how to carry out operations with a minimal use of force. This observation may initially seem banal or trivial, but we should keep in mind how Russian troops acted in previous operations in Chechnya and even to some extent in Georgia. Subtlety was not a strong suit in these operations, nor did it seem to be particularly encouraged by the political leadership. Instead, the goal seemed to be to use overwhelming force without much regard for civilian casualties. By contrast, the entire operation in Crimea was conducted with virtually no bloodshed or violence. There were three keys to this success:

Diversionary tactics

The Swedish analyst Johan Norberg was perhaps the first to highlight the significance of the major military exercise that was held on Ukraine’s eastern border in late February. While the Ukrainian government, as well as Western analysts and intelligence agencies, were distracted by the large-scale publicly announced mobilization in Russia’s Western military district, forces from the Southern military district and from airborne and Special Forces units located elsewhere in Russia were quietly transferred to Sevastopol.

Pre-emptive action

Russia’s intervention began while the world’s attention was still focused on the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, with orders being issued and troops transferred into Sevastopol before the closing ceremonies. The newly installed Ukrainian government was still trying to consolidate its power in Kyiv, while the international community was waiting to see what sorts of policies the new government would pursue and whether it would attempt to reconcile the pro-Russian and pro-EU segments of the population. The Russian government, on the other hand, determined that the overthrow of President Yanukovych posed a serious threat to its interests in Ukraine while at the same time providing an opportunity to resolve the position of the Black Sea Fleet in Crimea once and for all. Accordingly, it acted quickly to take control of the Crimean peninsula, using the political chaos in Ukraine as both a pretext and as cover for the intervention.

Rapid deployment

The Russian military used the element of surprise in combination with the prior presence of its troops at bases on Crimea to take control of the peninsula before the Ukrainian government and the international community had time to fully understand what was happening. The use of troops without insignia was an integral component of this action, as it allowed the Russian government to deny its complicity in the occupation of local government buildings and the blockading of Ukrainian military facilities. These denials created enough confusion to allow for the consolidation of Russian control over the region. Ukrainian troops were essentially confined to their bases before the government could provide them with orders to counter Russian activity.

Capable Special Forces

The next lesson learned from Russia’s operation in Crimea is that Russian Special Forces are well-trained and highly capable of carrying out special operations. The forces that were used in the operation represent some of the most elite units in the Russian military, including GRU (military intelligence) Special Forces, airborne units, and naval infantry. Of these, only the last is regularly based in Sevastopol. Based on their actions in Crimea, we saw that Russian Special Forces are equipped with far more modern equipment than what was quite recently considered standard issue for the Russian military. Individual soldiers were seen wearing new kit with better body armor, encrypted radios, and night vision equipment Advanced electronic warfare equipment was also used during the operation. In addition, the forces were distinguished by their ability to act in a restrained and “polite” fashion in tense situations where a single instance of the indiscriminate use of deadly force could have quickly turned a tense but largely non-violent situation into a large-scale violent confrontation. Again, the Russian military has not heretofore been known for this type of activity.

The Crimean operation didn’t teach us much, however, about the fighting capabilities of any of these forces, since no actual fighting occurred. Analysts were left to speculate that encrypted radios mean that local commanders were now being given more leeway on how to conduct operations on the ground or that improvements in communications and organizational structure had improved coordination across services. But the actual operations in Crimea tell us nothing about the extent to which the well-equipped and seemingly well-trained forces are actually capable of conducting autonomous operations, or the extent to which the Russian military has increased its ability to conduct complex combined arms operations that involve ground, naval, and air units all working together against a capable enemy. What’s more, we haven’t learned anything about the capabilities of regular Russian military units, since these units were not involved in the Crimea operation except as decoys on Ukraine’s eastern borders.

Political Lessons of Crimea

The most important set of lessons that Russia’s annexation of Crimea has taught other countries may be political in nature, and apply especially to the other former Soviet states. First of all, having Russian bases on the territory of one’s state makes an invasion much easier to carry out. Russian naval bases in Crimea were used as a beachhead for covertly moving Russian forces into Ukraine. Since the number of troops actually based in Crimea was significantly lower than the maximum of 25,000 agreed to between Russia and Ukraine in the 1997 treaty that regulated the status of the Black Sea Fleet, Russia could even claim that the increase in the number of Russian troops in Crimea did not violate the relevant treaty.* This precedent should be a concern to Moldova, Kyrgyzstan, Armenia, and other states with Russian troops stationed on their territory.

Second, former Soviet states need to watch out for Russian agents and collaborators working in their security and military forces. One of the reasons for the ineffectiveness of Ukraine’s military and security response in Crimea and subsequent covert activities in the country’s east is that that Ukraine’s secure communications channels are almost certainly compromised by Russian agents. Most other former Soviet states most likely have similar problems, though perhaps not to the same extent.

Finally, perhaps the most dangerous of Vladimir Putin’s statements regarding the crisis is his claim that Russia will defend ethnic Russians living outside of the country’s current borders. This statement in effect creates a potential fifth column in several former Soviet states. Russia could use the pretext of discrimination against ethnic Russians to launch future interventions in Kazakhstan, Latvia, and Lithuania, even if the actual ethnic Russians living in these states are not interested in Russian assistance.

Until February, most analysts considered Russia a status quo state in the international arena. The annexation of Crimea and Putin’s subsequent statements show that Russian leaders are not happy with their country’s current boundaries and have the tools to destabilize neighboring states. The U.S. government and the leaders of other Western states must take into account the potential for further Russian aggression against neighboring states in developing their policy toward Russia and Eastern Europe.



*The treaty required Russia to notify Ukraine of significant troop movements, so the failure to observe that provision was in violation of the treaty even though the numbers remained within permitted levels.

_________________
Absit omen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
helios
Colonel
Colonel
avatar

Messages : 235
Date d'inscription : 17/03/2014
Médaille sans Chevron

MessageSujet: Re: Comprendre l'action de l'armée russe en Crimée   Dim 25 Mai - 15:53

La source :
Citation :

http://warontherocks.com/2014/05/crimea-taught-us-a-lesson-but-not-about-how-the-russian-military-fights/

_________________
Absit omen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
rimonidz
Admin
Admin
avatar

Messages : 3059
Date d'inscription : 09/02/2012
Médaille de Citation à l'Ordre de l'Armée Médaille de la Participation à la Révolution Médaille de la Révolution Médaille de la Résistance Médaille du Mérite Militaire une citation Vermeil Médaille du Mérite National Médaille Mérite Géopolitique Médaille sans Chevron Médaille d’Honneur Médaille du Mérite Militaire Médaille de Blessé sans Citation Médaille de Blessé avec Citation

MessageSujet: Re: Comprendre l'action de l'armée russe en Crimée   Dim 25 Mai - 18:13

l'article est en on ne peut plus explicite ; toute action militaire doit avoir un cadre politique et une finalité politique : savoir ou en est la situation locale, et la mettre en position favorable pour une solution de sortie politique.

je décèle dans l'article une analyse des opérations au niveau opératif de l'armée russe en tchéchénie, il ressort que celle-ci suivait une logique stratégique cohérente, même si le début du conflit fut, pour diverses raisons, difficile, le temps d'adaptation faisant cependant son travail en faveur de l'armée russe.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
chega
Modérateurs
Modérateurs
avatar

Messages : 1804
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2014
Médaille de la Révolution Médaille de la Résistance Médaille Militaire Terre Médaille Militaire Médaille du Mérite Militaire une citation Vermeil Médaille sans Chevron Médaille de Blessé sans Citation

MessageSujet: Re: Comprendre l'action de l'armée russe en Crimée   Dim 25 Mai - 18:45

Citation :
Bonne lecture

Citation :

With the rapid operation that resulted in the annexation of Crimea earlier this year, the Russian military returned to the collective consciousness of the American public. Many commentators were impressed with the “little green men’s” professional demeanor and shiny new equipment. In some cases, this impression was undeservedly expanded to apply to the rest of the Russian military. In this context, it is important to discuss what the Crimean operation does and does not tell us about the capabilities of the Russian military.

The first clear lesson from the Crimean operation is that the Russian military understands how to carry out operations with a minimal use of force. This observation may initially seem banal or trivial, but we should keep in mind how Russian troops acted in previous operations in Chechnya and even to some extent in Georgia. Subtlety was not a strong suit in these operations, nor did it seem to be particularly encouraged by the political leadership. Instead, the goal seemed to be to use overwhelming force without much regard for civilian casualties. By contrast, the entire operation in Crimea was conducted with virtually no bloodshed or violence. There were three keys to this success:

Diversionary tactics

The Swedish analyst Johan Norberg was perhaps the first to highlight the significance of the major military exercise that was held on Ukraine’s eastern border in late February. While the Ukrainian government, as well as Western analysts and intelligence agencies, were distracted by the large-scale publicly announced mobilization in Russia’s Western military district, forces from the Southern military district and from airborne and Special Forces units located elsewhere in Russia were quietly transferred to Sevastopol.

Pre-emptive action

Russia’s intervention began while the world’s attention was still focused on the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, with orders being issued and troops transferred into Sevastopol before the closing ceremonies. The newly installed Ukrainian government was still trying to consolidate its power in Kyiv, while the international community was waiting to see what sorts of policies the new government would pursue and whether it would attempt to reconcile the pro-Russian and pro-EU segments of the population. The Russian government, on the other hand, determined that the overthrow of President Yanukovych posed a serious threat to its interests in Ukraine while at the same time providing an opportunity to resolve the position of the Black Sea Fleet in Crimea once and for all. Accordingly, it acted quickly to take control of the Crimean peninsula, using the political chaos in Ukraine as both a pretext and as cover for the intervention.

Rapid deployment

The Russian military used the element of surprise in combination with the prior presence of its troops at bases on Crimea to take control of the peninsula before the Ukrainian government and the international community had time to fully understand what was happening. The use of troops without insignia was an integral component of this action, as it allowed the Russian government to deny its complicity in the occupation of local government buildings and the blockading of Ukrainian military facilities. These denials created enough confusion to allow for the consolidation of Russian control over the region. Ukrainian troops were essentially confined to their bases before the government could provide them with orders to counter Russian activity.

Capable Special Forces

The next lesson learned from Russia’s operation in Crimea is that Russian Special Forces are well-trained and highly capable of carrying out special operations. The forces that were used in the operation represent some of the most elite units in the Russian military, including GRU (military intelligence) Special Forces, airborne units, and naval infantry. Of these, only the last is regularly based in Sevastopol. Based on their actions in Crimea, we saw that Russian Special Forces are equipped with far more modern equipment than what was quite recently considered standard issue for the Russian military. Individual soldiers were seen wearing new kit with better body armor, encrypted radios, and night vision equipment Advanced electronic warfare equipment was also used during the operation.  In addition, the forces were distinguished by their ability to act in a restrained and “polite” fashion in tense situations where a single instance of the indiscriminate use of deadly force could have quickly turned a tense but largely non-violent situation into a large-scale violent confrontation. Again, the Russian military has not heretofore been known for this type of activity.

The Crimean operation didn’t teach us much, however, about the fighting capabilities of any of these forces, since no actual fighting occurred. Analysts were left to speculate that encrypted radios mean that local commanders were now being given more leeway on how to conduct operations on the ground or that improvements in communications and organizational structure had improved coordination across services. But the actual operations in Crimea tell us nothing about the extent to which the well-equipped and seemingly well-trained forces are actually capable of conducting autonomous operations, or the extent to which the Russian military has increased its ability to conduct complex combined arms operations that involve ground, naval, and air units all working together against a capable enemy. What’s more, we haven’t learned anything about the capabilities of regular Russian military units, since these units were not involved in the Crimea operation except as decoys on Ukraine’s eastern borders.

Political Lessons of Crimea

The most important set of lessons that Russia’s annexation of Crimea has taught other countries may be political in nature, and apply especially to the other former Soviet states. First of all, having Russian bases on the territory of one’s state makes an invasion much easier to carry out. Russian naval bases in Crimea were used as a beachhead for covertly moving Russian forces into Ukraine. Since the number of troops actually based in Crimea was significantly lower than the maximum of 25,000 agreed to between Russia and Ukraine in the 1997 treaty that regulated the status of the Black Sea Fleet, Russia could even claim that the increase in the number of Russian troops in Crimea did not violate the relevant treaty.* This precedent should be a concern to Moldova, Kyrgyzstan, Armenia, and other states with Russian troops stationed on their territory.

Second, former Soviet states need to watch out for Russian agents and collaborators working in their security and military forces. One of the reasons for the ineffectiveness of Ukraine’s military and security response in Crimea and subsequent covert activities in the country’s east is that that Ukraine’s secure communications channels are almost certainly compromised by Russian agents. Most other former Soviet states most likely have similar problems, though perhaps not to the same extent.

Finally, perhaps the most dangerous of Vladimir Putin’s statements regarding the crisis is his claim that Russia will defend ethnic Russians living outside of the country’s current borders. This statement in effect creates a potential fifth column in several former Soviet states. Russia could use the pretext of discrimination against ethnic Russians to launch future interventions in Kazakhstan, Latvia, and Lithuania, even if the actual ethnic Russians living in these states are not interested in Russian assistance.

Until February, most analysts considered Russia a status quo state in the international arena. The annexation of Crimea and Putin’s subsequent statements show that Russian leaders are not happy with their country’s current boundaries and have the tools to destabilize neighboring states. The U.S. government and the leaders of other Western states must take into account the potential for further Russian aggression against neighboring states in developing their policy toward Russia and Eastern Europe.



*The treaty required Russia to notify Ukraine of significant troop movements, so the failure to observe that provision was in violation of the treaty even though the numbers remained within permitted levels.
traduction en francais pour ceux qui ne savant pa sl anglais


Crimée nous a appris une leçon, mais pas la façon dont les combats militaires russes
Dmitry Gorenburg
19 mai 2014 · dans l'analyse
Print Friendly

Avec l'opération rapide qui a abouti à l'annexion de la Crimée au début de cette année, l'armée russe est revenu à la conscience collective de l'opinion publique américaine. De nombreux commentateurs ont été impressionnés par le comportement professionnel du «Little Green Men" et équipement flambant neuf. Dans certains cas, cette impression a été injustement élargi pour s'appliquer au reste de l'armée russe. Dans ce contexte, il est important de discuter de ce que l'opération de Crimée fait et ne nous dit pas sur les capacités de l'armée russe.

La première leçon à tirer de l'opération de Crimée, c'est que l'armée russe sait comment mener des opérations avec un minimum de force. Cette observation peut sembler au départ banal ou insignifiant, mais il faut garder à l'esprit la façon dont les troupes russes ont agi dans les opérations précédentes en Tchétchénie et même dans une certaine mesure en Géorgie. Subtilité n'était pas un point fort de ces opérations, ni ne semble être particulièrement encouragé par les dirigeants politiques. Au lieu de cela, l'objectif semble être de recourir à la force écrasante sans trop se préoccuper des victimes civiles. En revanche, l'ensemble de l'opération a été menée en Crimée avec pratiquement pas de sang ou de violence. Il y avait trois clés de ce succès:

Des tactiques de diversion

L'analyste suédois Johan Norberg était peut-être le premier à mettre en évidence l'importance de la majeure exercice militaire qui a eu lieu à la frontière orientale de l'Ukraine à la fin de Février. Alors que le gouvernement ukrainien, ainsi que les analystes occidentaux et les agences de renseignement, ont été distraits par la grande échelle mobilisation annoncée publiquement dans le district occidental de militaires, les forces de la Russie de la région militaire du Sud et de l'air et des unités de forces spéciales situées ailleurs en Russie ont été discrètement transférés à Sébastopol.

Des mesures préventives

L'intervention de la Russie a commencé alors que l'attention du monde était encore axée sur les Jeux Olympiques d'hiver à Sotchi, avec des commandes émises et les troupes transférés dans Sébastopol avant la cérémonie de clôture. Le gouvernement ukrainien nouvellement installé essayait toujours de consolider son pouvoir à Kiev, alors que la communauté internationale attendait de voir quelles sortes de politiques du nouveau gouvernement poursuivrait et que ce serait tenter de concilier les segments pro-russes et pro-européen de la population. Le gouvernement russe, d'autre part, a déterminé que le renversement du président Ianoukovitch a posé une menace grave à ses intérêts en Ukraine, tout en fournissant en même temps une occasion de résoudre la position de la flotte de la mer Noire en Crimée une fois pour toutes. En conséquence, il a agi rapidement pour prendre le contrôle de la péninsule de Crimée, en utilisant le chaos politique en Ukraine à la fois comme un prétexte et comme couverture pour l'intervention.

Le déploiement rapide

L'armée russe a utilisé l'élément de surprise en combinaison avec la présence antérieure de ses troupes dans les bases de Crimée pour prendre le contrôle de la péninsule avant que le gouvernement ukrainien et la communauté internationale eu le temps de comprendre ce qui se passait. L'utilisation de troupes sans insignes était une partie intégrante de cette action, car elle a permis au gouvernement russe de nier sa complicité dans l'occupation des bâtiments de l'administration locale et le blocage des installations militaires ukrainiens. Ces dénégations ont créé suffisamment de confusion pour permettre la consolidation du contrôle russe sur la région. Troupes ukrainiennes ont été essentiellement confinés dans leurs bases avant que le gouvernement pourrait leur donner des ordres pour contrer l'activité de Russie.

Capable forces spéciales

La prochaine leçon apprise de l'exploitation de la Russie en Crimée, c'est que les forces spéciales russes sont bien formés et hautement capable d'effectuer des opérations spéciales. Les forces qui ont été utilisés dans l'opération représentent une partie des unités d'élite dans l'armée russe, y compris GRU (renseignement militaire de) forces spéciales, les unités aéroportées et infanterie de marine. Parmi ceux-ci, seul le dernier est régulièrement basée à Sébastopol. Sur la base de leurs actions en Crimée, nous avons vu que les forces spéciales russes sont équipés avec des équipements beaucoup plus moderne que ce qui a été tout récemment considéré question de la norme pour l'armée russe. Soldats individuels ont été vus portant nouveau kit avec une meilleure armure, radios cryptées, et de l'équipement de vision nocturne équipements de guerre électronique avancée a également été utilisé lors de l'opération. En outre, les forces ont été distingués par leur capacité à agir de manière sobre et «poli» dans des situations tendues où une seule instance de l'utilisation aveugle de la force mortelle pourrait avoir rapidement tourné une situation tendue, mais en grande partie non-violente dans un grand- échelle confrontation violente. Encore une fois, l'armée russe n'a pas été jusqu'ici connu pour ce type d'activité.

L'opération de Crimée ne nous apprend beaucoup, cependant, sur les capacités de combat de l'une de ces forces, car aucun combat réel s'est produite. Les analystes ont été laissés à spéculer que les radios cryptées signifie que les commandants locaux étaient maintenant accorder plus de latitude sur la façon de mener des opérations sur le terrain ou que l'amélioration des communications et de la structure organisationnelle ont amélioré la coordination entre les services. Mais les opérations réelles en Crimée ne nous disent rien sur la mesure dans laquelle les forces bien équipées et apparemment bien formés sont réellement capables de mener des opérations autonomes, ou la mesure dans laquelle l'armée russe a augmenté sa capacité de mener des opérations interarmes complexes qui impliquent terre, de la marine, et les unités aériennes qui travaillent tous ensemble contre un ennemi capable. De plus, nous n'avons pas appris quoi que ce soit sur les capacités des unités militaires russes réguliers, car ces unités ne sont pas impliqués dans le fonctionnement de la Crimée à l'exception des leurres sur les frontières orientales de l'Ukraine.

Leçons politiques de la Crimée

L'ensemble le plus important de leçons que l'annexion par la Russie de la Crimée a appris d'autres pays peut être de nature politique, et vaut en particulier pour les autres anciennes républiques soviétiques. Tout d'abord, ayant des bases russes sur le territoire de l'un de l'Etat fait une invasion beaucoup plus facile à réaliser. Bases navales russes en Crimée ont été utilisés comme une tête de pont pour déplacer secrètement les forces russes en Ukraine. Comme le nombre de troupes en fait basés en Crimée était significativement plus faible que le maximum de 25 000 convenu entre la Russie et l'Ukraine dans le traité de 1997 qui régissait le statut de la Flotte de la mer Noire, la Russie pourrait même prétendre que l'augmentation du nombre de troupes russes en Crimée n'a pas violé le traité en question. * Ce précédent devrait être une préoccupation pour la Moldavie, le Kirghizstan, l'Arménie et d'autres pays avec des troupes russes stationnées sur leur territoire.

Deuxièmement, les anciens États soviétiques doivent faire attention pour les agents et collaborateurs russes qui travaillent dans leurs forces de sécurité et militaires. Une des raisons de l'inefficacité de la réponse militaire et de sécurité de l'Ukraine en Crimée et des activités secrètes ultérieures dans l'est du pays, c'est que ce que les canaux de communication sécurisés de l'Ukraine sont presque certainement compromise par des agents russes. La plupart des autres anciennes républiques soviétiques ont probablement des problèmes similaires, mais peut-être pas dans la même mesure.

Enfin, peut-être le plus dangereux des déclarations de Vladimir Poutine au sujet de la crise est son affirmation selon laquelle la Russie défendra Russes ethniques vivant à l'extérieur des frontières actuelles du pays. Cette déclaration crée en effet une cinquième colonne potentielle dans plusieurs anciennes républiques soviétiques. La Russie pourrait utiliser le prétexte de la discrimination contre les Russes de lancer les interventions futures au Kazakhstan, la Lettonie et la Lituanie, même si les Russes ethniques réelles vivant dans ces pays ne sont pas intéressés par l'aide russe.

Jusqu'à Février, la plupart des analystes considérés comme la Russie un état de statu quo dans l'arène internationale. L'annexion de la Crimée et les déclarations ultérieures de Poutine montrent que les dirigeants russes ne sont pas heureux avec les limites actuelles de leur pays et avoir les outils pour déstabiliser les pays voisins. Le gouvernement américain et les dirigeants des autres pays occidentaux doivent prendre en compte le potentiel de l'agression russe contre les Etats voisins dans le développement de leur politique envers la Russie et Europe de l'Est.

 

* Le traité doit Russie à l'Ukraine de notifier les mouvements de troupes importants, de sorte que le non-respect de cette disposition constitue une violation du traité, même si les chiffres sont restés à des niveaux autorisés.

 

Dmitry Gorenburg est chercheur senior à la division études stratégiques de l'AIIC, une recherche et une analyse organisme sans but lucratif. Dr Gorenburg est également l'éditeur des revues problèmes de post-communisme et Russie politique et en droit et associé au Centre Davis de l'Université de Harvard pour les études russes et eurasiennes. Il a déjà enseigné au Département de gouvernement à l'Université Harvard et a servi comme directeur exécutif de l'Association américaine pour l'avancement des études slaves (AAASS). Il est titulaire d'un doctorat en science politique de l'Université Harvard et un BA en relations internationales de l'Université de Princeton. Il blogue sur les questions liées à l'armée russe à http://russiamil.wordpress.com.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
helios
Colonel
Colonel
avatar

Messages : 235
Date d'inscription : 17/03/2014
Médaille sans Chevron

MessageSujet: Re: Comprendre l'action de l'armée russe en Crimée   Dim 25 Mai - 19:09

Tout à fait d'accord.
Ici, l'auteur fait un comparatif avec la doctrine opérationnelle russe, qui passe du "tout bourrin" à une approche beaucoup plus malléable, flexible, et adaptative, où il faut faire attention non seulement au résultat de l'opération, mais aussi à l'image publique (disons grand-publique, ie. incluant l'opinion occidentale et mondiale. L'opinion russe étant habituée et aimant "les hommes, les vrais" (au sens macho et destructeur du thème- mais les choses changent, les Russes sont assez fiers de l'opération en ce moment). Auparavant, disons que seul comptait le résultat opé comme le démontre la libération du théâtre de la Doubrovka, où tous les terroristes ont été abattus, mais avec des victimes civiles nombreuses.

Il y a aussi un fait bien caché, mais souligné tout de même : l'incurie et l'aveuglement des Occidentaux. Quand l'auteur parle de "diversion", c'est avant tout par le fait que les Occidentaux s'attendaient à une action violente.
Ceci s'explique par un fait important, dont j'ai des échos à partir du Service d'Actions Etrangères européens. Dans ce service, à la Direction Russie et Ex-URSS, ne se trouvent quasiment que d'anciens étudiants des écoles soviétiques, mais issus des pays dominés par l'URSS, donc avec un fort ressentiment et une approche anti-russe systématique. Quand un analyste disait quelque chose comme : "Poutine est une personne réaliste, il n'envahira pas l'Ukraine", on le traite de pro-russe. Mais si un gars se ramène avec un "Poutine est un fou furieux diabolique, il va aller jusqu'à Berlin", il est recruté, c'est un spécialiste qui a tout compris.
Il s'agit ici d'une idéologisation des services. Une approche non réaliste qui a conduit à la situation actuelle.
Beaucoup de mes collègues croient Poutine quand il disait qu'il ne comptait pas annexer l'Ukraine. Il a juste saisi une opportunité "historique", et ne l'a pas ratée.

Ici se situe un élément clé dans les Affaires Etrangères chez les Occidentaux actuellement, comme l'ont démontré les révolutions arabes, les spécialistes sont peu écoutés par des cadres idéoligisés (voyons l'affaire Lybienne où les plus compétents ont tout simplement été ignorés -ils avertissaient du risque de chaos que l'on voit en ce moment- au profit de ceux qui chantaient la démocratie et qui disaient que grâce à l'élimination de Kadhafi les Monde Arabe et Musulman allait leur tomber dans les bras en les remerciant...)

Mais les Occidentaux sont en train de corriger cela.
Catherine Ashton et son service dépassé et anachronique sera réorganisé et des changements réalistes apparaitront bientôt, une fois les élections passées.

_________________
Absit omen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Comprendre l'action de l'armée russe en Crimée   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Comprendre l'action de l'armée russe en Crimée
Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
A.N.P DZ Défense  :: Actualités & Géopolitique :: Sciences & Techniques-
Sauter vers: